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Extracting variables and estimates from SAS prediction models


SAS ods output statements provide a simple alternative to advanced text manipulation techniques.

The example below extracts selected variables from proc hpgenselect and use these in proc corr, proc gampl, which outputs predicted probabilities. A final ods output statement in proc logistic extracts the concordance index, i.e. the measure for second order predictive capabilities of the model given as the probability that two different observations are correctly ordered with respect to the model based risk score.


Comments

Anonymous said…
Keep on working, great job!

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